An introduction to the life and history of lowell mill girls

Overproduction during the s caused the price of finished cloth to drop. This section needs additional citations for verification. The Association was run completely by the women themselves: Lowell Mill Girls In her autobiography, Harriet Hanson Robinson, the wife of a newspaper editor, provided an account of her earlier life as female factory worker from the age of ten in to in the textile Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts.

From May to August, the work day ended at 7pm, in September it ended at dark, from October to March it ended at 7: You have also been promised a good education of reading and writing, and a firm foundation in religion and lady-like manners.

I urged him to do so, and promised him my co-operation. When it was announced that the wages were to be cut down, great indignation was felt, and it was decided to strike or "turn out" en masse.

But this masked the bitter opposition of many workers to the 12—14 hours of exhausting, monotonous work, which they saw was corrosive to their desire to learn. Harriet Hanson Robinsonan eleven-year-old doffer at the time of the strike, recalled in her memoirs: After the war, the textile mills reopened, recruiting French Canadian men and women.

InFrancis C. The women involved in "turn-out" immediately withdrew their savings, causing "a run" on two local banks.

Lowell Mills

This reliance on immigrant workers slowly turned the mills into what they were trying to avoid: Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Economics, Discovery and Daily Life Skill: Questions for Discussion Read the introduction, view the images of the two original documents, and read the edited excerpts.

The Story of Textiles: The factory he planned to build near Boston would create new jobs rather than replace home spinners and weavers. Brownson is a man, he will endeavor to retrieve the injury he has done.

Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. It introduced a new system of integrated manufacturing to the United States and established new patterns of employment and urban development that were soon replicated around New England and elsewhere.

Framing their struggle for shorter work days and better pay as a matter of rights and personal dignity, they sought to place themselves in the larger context of the American Revolution. As the magazine grew in popularity, women contributed poems, ballads, essays, and fiction — often using their characters to report on conditions and situations in their lives.

Their life in the factory was made pleasant to them. The work days were long though and many of the women found that they were exhausted at the end of the day, both mentally and physically, and could barely stay awake during the lectures, as one former Lowell mill girl wrote:The Lowell Sun, a local newspaper, wants you to write about life as a "Mill Girl".

They want to know if working in the mills is everything you thought it would be. As you research the working conditions of the factories and the living conditions of the boardinghouses try to imagine yourself living in Lowell, Massachusetts during the s.

In response, "A Factory Girl" published a defense of the mill girls in the December issue of the Lowell Offering, a journal of articles, fiction, and poetry written by and for the Lowell factory operatives.

Lowell Mill Girls

The author was probably Harriet Jane Farley, a mill girl who eventually became editor of the Lowell Offering. Lowell Mill Girls In her autobiography, Harriet Hanson Robinson, the wife of a newspaper editor, provided an account of her earlier life as female factory worker (from the age of ten in to ) in the textile Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts.

The Lowell Mill Girls were young female workers who came to work in industrial corporations in Lowell, Massachusetts, during the Industrial Revolution in the United States.

What Was the Lowell System?

The workers initially recruited by the corporations were daughters of propertied New England farmers, typically between the ages of 15 and Lowell Mills Fiction & non-fiction about the Lowell textile mills in Lowell, Massachusetts & surrounding area.

The Lowell Mill Girls: Life in the Factory (Perspectives on History Series) by. Joanne Weisman Deitch. Cotton was King: A History of Lowell, Massachusetts by.

Arthur L. Eno Jr. These mill girls, as they were called, were required to live in company-owned dormitories adjacent to the mill and were expected to adhere to the rather strict moral code of conduct espoused by Lowell.

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An introduction to the life and history of lowell mill girls
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