The themes of intolerance reputation and injustice in the crucible by arthur miller

Act 4 Though hysteria overpowered the reputations of the accused in the past two acts, in act 4 the sticking power of their original reputations becomes apparent. Now we cannot hope the witch will accuse herself; granted?

Let you beware, Mr. How does this philosophy perpetuate hysteria? The only power they have left is in refusing to confess and preserving their integrity. As for the witches, none will deny that we are most eager for all their confessions. Logic has no power to combat paranoia and superstition even when the claims of the girls are clearly fraudulent.

Act 3 In Act 3, Hale continues to make ironic statements about the existence of concrete proof for the accusations of witchcraft. Try your hand at explaining how each of them does so. The witch and the victim. With John Proctor, on the other hand, we find that his true inner self is strong enough stand up for truth.

The prisoners have lost all faith in earthly authority figures and look towards the judgment of God. But you must understand, sir, that a person is either with this court or he must be counted against it, there be no road between. The most substantial female character is Abigail, who is portrayed as a devious and highly sexualized young woman.

Therefore, who may possibly be witness to it? The people in charge are so eager to hold onto their power that if anyone disagrees with them in the way the trials are conducted, it is taken as a personal affront and challenge to their authority.

When Hale asks him to recite his commandments, the only one he forgets is adultery. Hysteria blinds the people of Salem to reason as they become convinced that there is a grand Satanic plot brewing in town, and they must not hesitate to condemn anyone who could be involved.

The hysterical atmosphere and the dramatic performances of some of the accusers cause people to believe they have seen genuine proof of witchcraft. The faces that people present to the public are designed to garner respect in the community, but the witch trials have thrown this system into disarray.

Reverend Hale, who enters Salem naive and convinced of his greatness in discerning spirits, realizes he has caused irreparable damage. Proctor understands his reputation is at stake, a reputation he attempts to save by withholding his confession of an adulterous affair earlier in the play.

This outburst exemplifies the hypocrisy present in Salem as well as the ridiculousness of the witch trials. Why does he decide to do so anyways? This dichotomy functions as the underlying logic behind the witch trials.

If that was the case, though, this quote shows how even those not taken in by the hysterical claims or fear can still be affected by it.

In a play that seems hostile to religion, the ending is especially pointed.

The Crucible

This attitude comes from a man who has shown no remorse for condemning people to death throughout the play. Abigail distracts the judges from any rational investigation in this act by playing into this hysteria. Why Are Themes Important?

Because of the theocratic nature of the society, moral laws and state laws are one and the same: Because I lie and sign myself to lies!

Act 2 In this act, we learn more details about the accused that paint a clearer picture of the influence of reputation and social standing on the patterns of accusations. In the Puritan theocracy of Massachusetts, a government run by religious authorities, the dominant ideology held that the Puritans were a chosen people that the devil would do anything to destroy.

In The Crucible, the townsfolk accept and become active in the hysterical climate not only out of genuine religious piety but also because it gives them a chance to express repressed sentiments and to act on long-held grudges.

Armed with the false proof of these coerced confessions, the court officials aggressively persecute anyone who is accused. Here, Proctor is anticipating the loss of his reputation once it comes to light that he has had an affair with Abigail. I do wonder on it, when such a steady-minded minister as you will suspicion such a woman that never lied, and cannot, and the world knows she cannot!

The seeds are planted in Act 1, when Abigail is questioned about her activities in the woods and ends up accusing Tituba of witchcraft to avoid punishment.- Values and Morality in The Crucible by Arthur Miller The Crucible by Arthur Miller raises many thought provoking issues throughout the play, including the importance of personal integrity, injustice in society and the rights of the community versus the rights of the individual.

- Arthur Miller's The Crucible In The Crucible there are many different ways in which Arthur Miller captivates the interest of the audience.

These include the reasons for which Arthur Miller wrote the play, and various themes within the play such as love, hate, lies, betrayal, lust and injustice. A summary of Themes in Arthur Miller's The Crucible.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Crucible and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

These quotes from Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" reveal the personalities and motivations of the characters and the major themes in the play. slide 1 of 4 Use these Crucible quotes for class discussion, for a better understanding of the play, or for writing a literary analysis.

Read on for an overview of what a theme is, a list of important themes in The Crucible with specific act-by-act details, and a summary of how to use this information in your essays and other assignments.

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I’ll go over the most important quotes from The Crucible, explaining both their literal meaning and why they’re important. For clarity, the quotes are grouped into four themes: irony, fear and hysteria, pride and reputation, and power and authority.

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The themes of intolerance reputation and injustice in the crucible by arthur miller
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